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52 Ancestors #12: Kristīne Kvante

Time for Week 12 of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge! As noted in my first post of this challenge, I am starting with my most ancient known ancestors.

This week’s ancestor is Kristīne Kvante, born July 11, 1833 (some sources say 1830, but she is not even a year old at the time of […]

52 Ancestors #11: Kristīne Kukure

Time for Week 11 of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge! As noted in my first post of this challenge, I am starting with my most ancient known ancestors.

At the close of last week’s post, I mentioned that this week I would be talking about one of my “more puzzling female ancestors” – this […]

WW1 Diary – March 14, 1917

Thirty-eighth installment from the diary of my great-grandfather’s sister Alise, written during the First World War. When the diary starts, she is living just a few miles from the front lines of the Eastern Front, and is then forced to flee with her husband and two young daughters to her family’s house near Limbaži as […]

52 Ancestors #10 – Ēde Jansone

Time for Week 10 of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge! As noted in my first post of this challenge, I am starting with my most ancient known ancestors.

This week’s ancestors is Ēde Jansone, born May 27, 1845, died sometime after 1897. She is my great-great-great-grandmother, by way of my paternal grandmother’s paternal grandmother […]

WW1 Diary – March 5, 1917

Thirty-seventh installment from the diary of my great-grandfather’s sister Alise, written during the First World War. When the diary starts, she is living just a few miles from the front lines of the Eastern Front, and is then forced to flee with her husband and two young daughters to her family’s house near Limbaži as […]

52 Ancestors #9: Kače Rožlapa

Time for Week 9 of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge! As noted in my first post of this challenge, I am starting with my most ancient known ancestors.

This week’s ancestor is Kače Rožlapa, born c. 1822 and died after 1886. She is my great-great-great-grandmother, by way of my paternal grandfather’s paternal grandfather Pēteris […]

52 Ancestors #8: Pēteris Celmiņš

Time for Week 8 of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge! As noted in my first post of this challenge, I am starting with my most ancient known ancestors.

This week’s ancestor is Pēteris Celmiņš. Now, the first question to answer here is – which one? I have five in my paternal line. Evidently this […]

52 Ancestors #7: Līze Mildere

Time for Week 7 of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge! As noted in my first post of this challenge, I am starting with my most ancient known ancestors.

This week’s ancestor is Līze Mildere, born April 27, 1825, and died prior to October 1892. She is my great-great-great-grandmother, by way of my paternal grandmother’s […]

WW1 Diary – February 15, 1917

Thirty-sixth installment from the diary of my great-grandfather’s sister Alise, written during the First World War. When the diary starts, she is living just a few miles from the front lines of the Eastern Front, and is then forced to flee with her husband and two young daughters to her family’s house near Limbaži as […]

52 Ancestors #6: Jēkabs Francis

Time for Week 6 of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge! As noted in my first post of this challenge, I am starting with my most ancient known ancestors.

This week’s ancestor is Jēkabs Francis, born March 25, 1825, and died sometime after 1884. He is my great-great-great-grandfather, by way of my maternal grandfather’s paternal […]