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In Loving Memory: A Special 52 Ancestors Post

This is my Week #39 52 Ancestors post, and it is dedicated to a very recent ancestor of mine, my grandmother Aina Margrieta Līcīte, married name France, who passed away yesterday at the age of 95.

Aina Margrieta (Līcīte) France

October 19, 1919 – October 29, 2014

Passport photo of Aina Līcīte, c. 1947

Aina Margrieta Līcīte was born [...]

The Dreaded Corner House of Rīga

During the Soviet era, there were few buildings so feared and dreaded in Latvia as the “Corner House” – an otherwise nondescript building on the corner of Brīvības and Stabu streets (though of course Brīvības street – meaning Freedom Street – was called Lenin Street during the Soviet era, couldn’t have any references to freedom). [...]

Five Cents – November 25, 1927

This is part of my series of interesting newspaper articles that I find in the old Latvian newspapers available through Periodika. Most of the articles I post are in some way related to migration, wars or other events that are of particular genealogical note.

Source: Pieci Santīmi (Five Cents), the evening edition of Pēdejais Brīdis (Last [...]

Research on Second World War Displaced Persons

I am posting this on behalf of a member of the FEEFHS (Federation of Eastern European Family History Societies) Facebook group, since I know a number of readers here are descendants of Second World War Displaced Persons, and could thus help in the research.

She says:

As part of my master’s thesis on the legacy of WWII [...]

Bringing Out the Great-Grandfathers, Part 2

Part 2 in my series on my great-grandfathers. Part 1 is here.

Today’s great-grandfather is Arvīds Vilhelms Francis. Arvīds was born on August 7th, 1894 (Old Style) at one o’clock in the afternoon at Kroņi farm on the Nābe estate, south of the town of Limbaži in northern Latvia. His father was Roberts Jūlijs Francis (parents [...]

Bringing Out the Great-Grandfathers, Part 1 (updated)

I was looking through old blog posts recently, and realized that I started a series of posts on my great-grandfathers (almost four years ago now), but that I never finished the series. I only talked about one of my great-grandfathers!

So I’m going to finish this series now, and I will start by expanding on the [...]

Baltic Herald - August 3, 1904

This is part of my series of interesting newspaper articles that I find in the old Latvian newspapers available through Periodika. Most of the articles I post are in some way related to migration, wars or other events that are of particular genealogical note.

Source: Baltijas Vēstnesis (Baltic Herald), August 3, 1904

Jelgava. Emigrants. The Jelgava Gazette [...]

Connecting with Living Relatives

People always ask me how to find and connect with living relatives. It can be done, and there are a number of ways to approach it. Depending on the approach and what your priorities are in locating living relatives, you could meet relatives, distant or close, from all over the world! I’ve made connections with [...]

Latvian Herald – June 6, 1921

This is part of my series of interesting newspaper articles that I find in the old Latvian newspapers available through Periodika. Most of the articles I post are in some way related to migration, wars or other events that are of particular genealogical note.

Today’s article makes reference to people referred to as “optanti” – people [...]

Exciting News for Latvians Around the World!

Exciting news from the Latvian Saeima (Parliament) today: They have passed the new law on dual citizenship.

The passing of this law opens up a number of doors that had been closed in 1995, or hadn’t been open at all. World War 2-era exiles and their descendants can apply for dual citizenship again. Dual citizenship is [...]