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Rīga Banns, Week of April 7, 1925

Part of my series of publishing the banns read in Rīga in the interwar period. See this post for more details.

April 7, 1925 (Latvijas Vēstnesis [Latvian Herald], April 8, 1925)

Military clerk Pēteris Mednis (Lubeja) and Elza Ceļmala (Gulbene)
Clerk Hugo Velens (Sigulda) and Irma Wilhelmina Ozoliņš (Rīga)
Military clerk Arnolds Vīksne (Ikšķile) and Marta Paulina Andersons nee [...]

Riga Banns, Week of March 31, 1925

Part of my series of publishing the banns read in Rīga in the interwar period. See this post for more details.

March 31, 1925 (published in Latvijas Vēstnesis [Latvian Herald], April 1, 1925)

Railway worker Jānis Rudolfs Kriķis (Palsmane) and Lisete Milda Beitels (Bauska)
Merchant Kristian Marinnus Jeusen (Denmark) and Elvīra Vītols (Rīga)
Artist Sergei Jakovlev (Vilnius) and Tekla [...]

Rīga Banns, Week of March 24, 1925

Part of my series of publishing the banns read in Rīga in the interwar period. See this post for more details.

March 24, 1925 (published in Latvijas Vēstnesis [Latvian Herald], March 25, 1925)

Students Eduards Paulis Čaibe (Īle) and Hermīne Veronika Leimanis (Mežmuiža)
Clerk Paulis Erichs Pētersons (Straupe) and Emma Matilde Miezis (Rīga)
Locksmith Kārlis Wilhelms Kepke (Cēsis) and [...]

Rīga Banns, Week of March 17, 1925

Tracking down your ancestors’ activities in interwar Latvia can be tricky. The official records are not online. Any birth, marriage or death record needs to be obtained from a registry office, either by going in person (cheapest), ordering through an embassy (expensive, or direct from the registry office if you’re lucky) or by asking someone [...]

Tracking World War One Refugees

The First World War was a time of chaos across Europe. And yet, there was order as well, at least in Latvian territory and amongst Latvians residing elsewhere. The documentation surrounding Latvian refugees of the First World War is extremely comprehensive, though not easily accessible. But hopefully that will change over time.

During the First World [...]

Ž is for Žandarmērija

So now we have come to the end of the Family History Through the Alphabet challenge! I’m happy that I’ve been able to complete the whole challenge. What next, I wonder?

So, Ž is for Žandarmērija… “žandarmērija” is the Latvian word for “gendarmerie”. This is typically a branch of military that also provides policing functions. This [...]

R is for Raduraksti

But wait, what about Q? Well, the Latvian alphabet doesn’t have a Q, so R is the next letter of the Family History Through the Alphabet challenge! This is only the first letter I’m skipping, and being as I’ve done a lot of extra ones for the extra letters in the Latvian alphabet, I think [...]

P is for Parish

Let’s continue the Family History Through the Alphabet challenge!

The important word of the day is “parish” – and in Latvian, it has a name with a P too – “pagasts”. Now, this refers to civil parishes, rather than religious ones. A religious parish or congregation in Latvian would be called a “draudze”.

There are hundreds of [...]

N is for New Style

Almost caught up on the Family History Through the Alphabet challenge! Today we’re talking about dates, dates and more dates – the topic is New Style vs. Old Style!

No, we’re not talking about fashions for an evening out, but rather different calendars. Up until 1918, the Russian Empire used the Julian calendar. Most European countries [...]

I is for International Tracing Service

This is a key letter for the Family History Through the Alphabet challenge. Not for the letter itself, but for the subject matter. The International Tracing Service can be the key to unlocking one’s family history – if your family emigrated from Latvia in the post-Second World War period.

I’ve already talked about the ITS on [...]