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Research on Second World War Displaced Persons

I am posting this on behalf of a member of the FEEFHS (Federation of Eastern European Family History Societies) Facebook group, since I know a number of readers here are descendants of Second World War Displaced Persons, and could thus help in the research.

She says:

As part of my master’s thesis on the legacy of WWII [...]

Bringing Out the Great-Grandfathers, Part 2

Part 2 in my series on my great-grandfathers. Part 1 is here.

Today’s great-grandfather is Arvīds Vilhelms Francis. Arvīds was born on August 7th, 1894 (Old Style) at one o’clock in the afternoon at Kroņi farm on the Nābe estate, south of the town of Limbaži in northern Latvia. His father was Roberts Jūlijs Francis (parents [...]

Bringing Out the Great-Grandfathers, Part 1 (updated)

I was looking through old blog posts recently, and realized that I started a series of posts on my great-grandfathers (almost four years ago now), but that I never finished the series. I only talked about one of my great-grandfathers!

So I’m going to finish this series now, and I will start by expanding on the [...]

“Rally Under the Latvian Flag!”

“Rally Under the Latvian Flag!”

This was the headline of the exhortation published on July 19, 1915, by Latvian members of the Imperial Russian Duma, Jānis Goldmanis and Jānis Zālītis, announcing that the Imperial Russian Army was allowing the formation of national battalions – in this case, the Latvian Riflemen Battalions, known in Latvian as “Strēlnieki”.

They [...]

WW1 Diary – June 27, 1916

Twenty-eighth installment from the diary of my great-grandfather’s sister Alise, written during the First World War. When the diary starts, she is living just a few miles from the front lines of the Eastern Front, and is then forced to flee with her husband and two young daughters to her family’s house near Limbaži as [...]

WW1 Diary – June 26, 1916

Twenty-seventh installment from the diary of my great-grandfather’s sister Alise, written during the First World War. When the diary starts, she is living just a few miles from the front lines of the Eastern Front, and is then forced to flee with her husband and two young daughters to her family’s house near Limbaži as [...]

WW1 Diary – June 24, 1916

Twenty-sixth installment from the diary of my great-grandfather’s sister Alise, written during the First World War. When the diary starts, she is living just a few miles from the front lines of the Eastern Front, and is then forced to flee with her husband and two young daughters to her family’s house near Limbaži as [...]

Remembering June 14, 1941

June 14, 1941 was the day when thousands of Latvians, Estonians and Lithuanians were deported to Siberia by the occupying Soviet forces. You can see posts I’ve made in other years here, here and here.

I’ll be honest. I struggle with what to say on days like this. Part of me asks “How can something like [...]

WW1 Diary – June 1, 1916

Twenty-fifth installment from the diary of my great-grandfather’s sister Alise, written during the First World War. When the diary starts, she is living just a few miles from the front lines of the Eastern Front, and is then forced to flee with her husband and two young daughters to her family’s house near Limbaži as [...]

Exciting News for Latvians Around the World!

Exciting news from the Latvian Saeima (Parliament) today: They have passed the new law on dual citizenship.

The passing of this law opens up a number of doors that had been closed in 1995, or hadn’t been open at all. World War 2-era exiles and their descendants can apply for dual citizenship again. Dual citizenship is [...]